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DIY: Stuff Sack Sewing Pattern – FREE!

Next up in my collection of FREE sewing patterns is my Stuff Sack pattern, which is a drawstring bag with a flat bottom. The pattern prints as a 4-page PDF with circle templates if needed.

Stuff Sack free sewing pattern

I was originally inspired to make my own Stuff Sacks several years ago because when I was inspired by the stuff sacks used by campers and backpackers to keep stuff organized in a backpack. I use one stuff sack to save pinecones, acorns, feathers and other trail treasures, and another one to store my acrylic paints – 14 bottles. I use another one for a lunch bag. You could use one for your knitting or embroidery project. The possibilities are endless!

Note: Because I create with human hands, my cutting is never perfect. My sewing is never perfectly straight. My circles aren’t perfectly symmetrical or even. And I always have threads to trim. Please forgive me for that ;) This is just a fun project I was excited to share. I’m sure there are many ways to make this; I’m just sharing my concept and process here.

Sewing Instructions:

Cutting

  • Cut Outer fabric according to measurements above.
  • Cut Lining fabric 1″ higher than Outer fabric measurements above.
  • Cut Flannel fabric the same size as Outer fabric, according to measurements above.

Layout

  1. Lay Flannel fabric down, place Outer fabric right side up on top of Flannel, matching the longer sides. Place Lining fabric right side down over Outer fabric so that right sides are together. Sew along the long edge, using 1/4 inch seam allowance.
  2. Open layers and press seams layers toward Lining with Flannel behind it.
  3. Fold in half with shorter sides right side together, lining up the seam you sewed in step above. Sew to create an open-ended tube, leaving a 3″ opening in the middle of the Lining fabric for turning later.

Stuff Sack Pattern: layout

Attach Piping to Circle Bottom

Change to zipper foot attachment, line up raw edge of piping to raw edge of right side of Outer fabric circle, and sew, guiding the zipper foot directly over the stitching line of the piping.

Stuff Sack Pattern: piping

Attach Circles

  1. Lay Flannel circle down, place wrong side of Outer fabric circle on top of Flannel. Pin these layers to outer end of tube with right sides together. (Hint: lots of pins!) Sew circle to tube, using previous piping stitching line as your sewing guide. (Note: your circle may not fit perfectly in the circumference of the fabric tube. Puckers and gathers add nice puffiness to the base.)
  2. Pin Lining fabric circle to Lining end of tube with right sides together. Sew inside circle to Lining end of tube.

Stuff Sack Pattern: attaching circles

Finishing

  1. Turn tube right side out through the opening you left in step above.
  2. Slip stitch opening left in Lining fabric closed.
  3. Tuck Lining back into Outer fabric to create a sack, leaving Lining up about ½” as a contrasting border along top rim. Press.

Drawstring

  1. Measuring down from top fold to stitch line, stitch in the ditch. Then top-stitch close to fold, which will create a channel for drawstring to slide through.
  2. Backstitch at side seam and directly above, along the fold. This will reinforce the opening you’re going to tear open in the next step.
  3. With your seam ripper, tear open a couple stitches (barely one-half inch) at the side seam from your top stitching to stitching at top fold.
  4. Place safety pin or bodkin onto end of your drawstring or shoelace. Lace through channel. Tie ends in knot or thread through a toggle.

Stuff Sack Pattern: drawstring

Finished!

Fill your new stuff sack with your trails treasures, snacks knitting project or art supplies, and off you go!

I added this free Stuff Sack sewing pattern to the tab at the top of my blog called Sewing Patterns. Stay tuned for more FREE patterns coming soon!

Happy sewing!

Terri

PS – If you make this pattern, I would love it if you share a photo of your project in the Flickr group I created. Thank you!

Dresden Color Wheel Mug Rug Tutorial

I had a lot of fun making mini dresden color wheels this past week, so I wanted to share a quick tutorial on how to make your own. I backed this one with felt to use as a mug rug, which really brightens up my work space and makes me happy!

dresden color wheel mug rug

dresden color wheel mug rugs

Note: Because I create with human hands, my cutting is never perfect. My sewing is never perfectly straight. My circles aren’t perfectly symmetrical or even. And I always have threads to trim. Please forgive me for that ;) This is just a fun little project I was excited to share. I’m sure there are many ways to make this; I’m just sharing my concept and process here.

After choosing fabrics from your stash, cut 20 wedges using one of the smaller measurements on the dresden template. For the examples pictured here, I used the 1-1/2″ and the 2″ positions to cut my 20 wedges.

cutting dresdens

Fold each wedge in half the long way and stitch along the top, using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Turn right side out to form a point at the top.

turning dresden plate right side out

This is a great step to chain-stitch the pieces together.chain stitchingLay each wedge right side together, and stitch all the wedges together to form a ring, using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Press seams open.

sewing dresden plates together

dresden plates sewn into a circleMeasure the inner circle and add 1/2″ to 3/4″ to each side for the seam allowance. Cut a circle from paper or plastic to use as a template; cut 2 circles from your center fabric.

measuring inner circle

For these smaller dresdens, I cut circles that measured 4″ to 4-3/8″. With right sides together, stitch the two circles together using a 1/4″ seam allowance. Cut notches in the seam allowance to reduce bulk. Pinch the fabric on one side of the circle and cut a small slit. Pull the fabrics through that slit to turn the circles right side out. Press.

circles right sides together

cut notches in seam allowancecut slit in circle for turning

circles sewn togetherLay the fabric circles on top of dresden ring, pin if necessary, and top-stitch to attach to ring of the wedges. I top-stitched twice to make sure it was secure.

dresden color wheel mug rug

Lay the dresden on a piece of felt for backing and top-stitch 1/8″ in around the points and valleys. Trim the felt close to the points and valleys.

felt backing for dresden color wheel mug rug

Stitch in the ditch around the circle to fasten more securely to the felt backing.

dresden color wheel mug rug

Happy sewing, my friends!

Terri

PS – Note: Because I create with human hands, my cutting is never perfect. My sewing is never perfectly straight. My circles aren’t perfectly symmetrical or even. And I always have threads to trim. Please forgive me for that ;) This is just a fun project I was excited to share. I’m sure there are many ways to make this; I’m just sharing my concept and process here.

DIY: Yoga Matt Sewing Pattern – FREE!

I decided to make my collection of sewing patterns available to you for FREE! First up is my Yoga Matt pattern, which prints as a 3-page PDF.

Yoga Matt Pattern

I was originally inspired to make my own Yoga Matt several years ago because I love to lay in the grass and chill out on a warm, sunny day. I also wanted to be able to take this with me to the park or the beach, so I added the straps to wrap around the rolled up matt for easy carrying.

Dimensions28 wide by 69 long, finished.

Materials

  70 5 squares, or

  Set of fat quarters for a variety (I used a set of 12 fat quarters for the yoga matt pictured), or

  Scraps from your stash

  1/2 yd. for border

  2 yds. of batting

  2 yds. of denim or heavyweight fabricfor backing

  Extra wide double fold bias tape for ties

Cutting Instructions

  Patchwork Squares: Cut 70 5 squares

  BordersNote: It’s best to cut these after you’ve pieced your patchwork.

  Cut two strips measuring 2½ wide x width of the pieced patchwork (about 23¼“).

  Cut two strips measuring 2½ wide x length of pieced patchwork including top and bottom borders (about 63¾)

  Batting: Cut batting that measures 34 wide x 75 tall.

  Backing: Cut denim that measures 34 wide x 75 tall

  Bias Strips: cut 2 strips 17½ long

Sewing Instructions

Patchwork Top

  1. Lay out 70 squares in 14 rows of 5 squares per row in a pleasing manner. Using ¼ seam allowances, sew first row of squares together, pressing to left side.
  2. Sew second row of squares together, pressing to right side.
  3. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until all squares are sewn together into rows.
  4. Sew rows together, one at a time, lining up seam allowances, which should be going in opposite directions to reduce bulk. Press patchwork.

yoga matt patchwork top

Borders

  1. Measure width of patchwork at top, center and bottom to get an average measurement. (Mine came out to about 23¼” wide.) Cut the borders to this measurement x 2½ wide.
  2. Sew the top and bottom borders to the patchwork. Press toward border fabric.
  3. Measure the length of the patchwork, including the top and bottom borders. (Mine came to about 63¾” long.) Cut the borders to this measurement x 2½. You may need to piece two strips together to get a border long enough to fit the sides.
  4. Sew the long borders to the patchwork. Press toward border fabric.

yoga matt borders

Ties

  1. Top stitch 1/8 on both sides of each of the two 17½ strips. Cut in half so you have four strips, each measuring approximately 8¾ long.
  2. Pin two strips on top of each other, 6 in from top corners of patchwork with raw edges together. (strips will be lying flat toward the patchwork)
  3. Attached strips to patchwork with basting stitch using 1/8 seam allowance.

yoga matt ties

Make A Quilt Sandwich

  1. Lay your batting down on a flat surface (such as large table or basement floor), smoothing out with your hands. Tape batting down with masking tape at as many spots as you need to get the batting as flat and smooth as possible.
  2. Lay your backing on top of the batting with the denim right side up. Smooth out to get the backing as flat as possible.
  3. Lay your patchwork on top of the backing with the right side down. Smooth out to get the patchwork as flat
    as possible.
  4. Pin all layers together with safety pins or quilters’ bent safety pins.
  5. Sew all the way around the layers, using a 1/4 seam allowance, leaving an opening for turning. I recommend leaving an opening at least 8 wide to give you enough room to turn right side out.
  6. Trim excess backing and batting to a 1/2 seam allowance.
  7. Turn layers right side out through opening. Press opening seam allowance to inside and hand-stitch closed with a whipstitch or blindstitch.

yoga matt quilt sandwich

Quilting

Quilt lines that are 1/4 from the border seams, then quilt each row 1/4 in from the seams going side to side, and then quilt each column 1/4 in from the seams going top to bottom.

yoga matt  quilting

*Roll up your new yoga matt, wrap the ties around the roll, tie into bows, and off you go!

Note: This Matt is not just for outdoor use. If you want to use this matt for doing yoga on a slippery floor, you could use a non-slip rug pad underneath it. (check the craft supply stores or carpet stores) I would cut the rug pad into smaller pieces and stitch them to the back of the yoga matt.

I added this free Yoga Matt sewing pattern to the tab at the top of my blog called Sewing Patterns. Stay tuned for more FREE patterns coming soon!

Happy sewing!

Terri

PS – If you make this pattern, I would love it if you share a photo of your project in the Flickr group I created. Thank you!

From My Sketchbook: April Progress

In order to fill up more sketchbooks, which is on my bucket list for 2015, I’m having fun coming up with new drawing prompts, so I’ve been trying to sketch A LOT more lately. One thing I’m doing is a monthly calendar. But instead of using it like a diary, I’m using it to do a daily doodle.

For the month of April I’m taking inspiration from what I see outside in my part of the world right now, which are spring flowers – crocus, daffodils, forsythia buds opening, vinca vines and soon, tulips, magnolia blooms and crabapple blossoms.

Here’s my progress so far. I got a little behind at first so then I got a little ahead.

sketchbook page April doodles so far

Time just slips away when I’m working in my sketchbook, especially when I have a techno / electronic beat going in the background! I’m on a roll so I’m just going to keep going.

Terri

Click here to see my January doodles

Click here to see my February doodles

Click here to see my March doodles

Infographic at the Nature Center

I received an email from someone at the Chippewa Moraine Ice Age Center at a state park in northern Wisconsin, wanting to purchase my butterfly infographic as a poster. They are going to hang it on display to help educate visitors about monarchs, their migration journeys, and the problems the monarch population is facing due to habitat loss.

butterfly infographic map

I illustrated and designed this fun infographic and map to show the amazing migration of Monarch butterflies, along with other fun facts about other butterflies, fragile and fascinating creatures. It also shows some differences between butterflies and moths that people often wonder about.

It makes a great educational print which also looks nice framed and hanging on the wall. I can vouch for that because the framed print shown below is hanging on the wall in my home office, which makes me happy ;) It’s also listed in my shop as an 11″ x 14″ print, printed on photo matte card stock paper with a slight border for framing allowance.

Butterfly Infographic Map

Clients like the Department of National Resources (DNR) and State Parks are dream clients for me, so I’m thrilled to have my illustrations and designs on display or used as handouts at conferences.

Terri

Notes From the Garden: Spring Treasures

We are starting to see more and more signs of spring around here. This week we have new daffodils blooming and buds s.l.o.w.l.y. starting to open on some of our vines, shrubs and trees.

first daffodil of spring

spring greens

Sometimes you have to look closely to find treasures in the wild.

vinca vines

buds on crab apple tree

skull in backyard

look – a small skull! how cool is that!
bird skull found in backyard ducks in backyard

look – a mallard couple, probably stopping by to ask for directions to the nearest pond!

We finished all our spring clean-up chores, so now I’m ready to plant some spring pansies and spruce up our patio with a few flowering containers and baskets.

It’s such a fun time of year to start exploring our backyard again! You never know what treasures you’re going to find.

Terri

 

Fresh-Cut Flowers for Spring

The fresh-cut flowers I bought earlier this week are one of the most beautiful bouquets I’ve ever bought. We’ve had clouds, rain and storms a good part of the week, so these flowers cheer me up, make me think of spring, and brighten my office with pops of color and textures.

fresh cut flowers for April 6

Since I buy a new bouquet frequently (every other week), I finally remember the names of these flowers. Here we have light pink alstroemeria, purple statice, white daisies, lavender daisy mums, a light pink and fuchsia carnations, and fuchsia roses. fresh cut fuchsia roses fresh cut  pink alstromeria fresh cut  purple statice fresh cut  pink carnation fresh cut  lavender pom daisy fresh cut  white daisy

These bouquets include a small variety of flowers, yet offer a cheerful new palette each week, ranging from bright fuchsia, light pink, peach, lavender and purple, whites and hues of green.

fresh cut flowers for April 6Happy Friday to you! Hope you’re out enjoying Spring!

Terri

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